Rosemary O’Leary ’88 PhD (PA) picks up three lifetime achievement awards, completes set of five

alum-news-buttonrosemary-olearyRosemary O’Leary won three awards for lifetime achievement in public administration this past summer, including the Routledge Award for Outstanding Contributions to Public Management Research from the International Research Society for Public Management, the Frederickson Award from the Public Management Research Association, and the Keith C. Provan Award from the Academy of Management. With these three awards, O’Leary has won five out of the available five lifetime achievement awards in her field. In 2014 she was awarded the Dwight Waldo Award from the American Society for Public Administration and in 2016 she won the John Gaus Award from the American Political Science Association. To see more about her achievements, click here.

Alexander Rossino ’92 MA (Hist) / ’99 PhD (Hist) publishes novel about the Civil War

alum-news-buttonSixDaysSept_LRGAlexander Rossino has published Six Days in September with Savas Beatie, a publisher of historical titles of distinction. The book is a historical novel based on true events that occurred in the Civil War, specifically General Robert E. Lee’s Maryland campaign of 1862. Previously Rossino has published extensively on WWII, Germany, and the Holocaust including the 2003 book Hitler Strikes Poland: Blitzkrieg, Ideology, and Atrocity from the University Press of Kansas. For more information about Rossino’s new book, click here.

Raissian ’08 MPA/’13 PhD (PA) and Bullinger ’12 MPA find raising minimum wage reduces child neglect

alum-news-buttonRaissian & BullingerKerri Raissian and Lindsey Bullinger recently published “Money matters: does the minimum wage affect child maltreatment rates?” in Children and Youth Services Review. They reviewed eleven years of records on child abuse and neglect and found that increases in the minimum wage correlate with declining child maltreatment rates. Their findings were recently featured on sciencedaily.com. To read that article, click here.  Raissian is assistant professor of public policy at University of Connecticut, where she specializes in child and family policy, family violence and child welfare. Bullinger is associate instructor in the school of public and environmental affairs at Indiana University at Bloomington.

Rich Schein ’89 PhD (Geog) serving as Associate Dean at University of Kentucky

alum-news-button

RichSchein.blogRichard H. Schein, is serving as Associate Dean of Faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Kentucky, where he is also a professor of geography. Schein is an expert in the study of historical and cultural landscapes, which he explores through his research on race in the United States. Schein returned to Maxwell in April to present the Donald Meinig Lecture, an annual event hosted by the geography department. For a video of his lecture click here.

Yoshina Hurgobin ’09 MPA/’11 MA (Hist)/’16 PhD (Hist) now assistant professor at Kennesaw State University

alum-news-button

Yoshina Hurgobin is now an assistant professor of South Asian history in the Department of History and Philosophy at Kennesaw State University in Georgia. Before her position at Kennesaw State, Hurgobin was a postdoctoral fellow at the Indian Ocean World Centre, at McGill University. Her research looks at questions of labor migration, citizenship, rights, and nationalism in the diaspora of South Asia. Her work has appeared in the journal International Labor Working-Class History and in the edited volume Histories of Medicine and Healing in The Indian Ocean World. She is currently working on a book project that examines the connections between Indian immigrant workers’ struggles for rights, their claims to citizenship, and the process of nation-making in colonial Mauritius.

Book by Herrington J. Bryce ’66 PhD (Econ) addresses burdens on government, in light of infrastructure and environmental needs

alum-news-button

Herrington J. Bryce’s new book, Nonprofits as Policy Solutions to the Burden of Government, has been published by De Gruyter, an independent academic publisher.The book is addressed to policymakers and administrators at all levels of government who are faced with growing needs for large expenditures particularly in infrastructure and other hard assets but a diminishing capacity or willingness to finance these through compulsory taxes and larger and larger governments.  It highlights the essential design of nonprofits that can effectively, efficiently, and equitably reduce this burden and in some cases completely take it over.  It shows that these innovative and independent nonprofits are allowed within current law and practice and that they may do so alone or in a variety of collaborative modes. Bryce is Life of Virginia Professor of Business at the College of William and Mary, where he teaches corporate financial strategy, corporate cost and profit-planning, and nonprofit finance and management.

Robert Deal ’85 MA (Hist) releases new book “The Law of the Whale Hunt: Dispute Resolution, Property Law, and American Whalers, 1780-1880”

alum-news-button
Dr. Robert Deal recently published his book, The Law of the Whale Hunt: Dispute Resolution, Property Law, and American Whalers, 1780-1880. In the book, Deal offers a historically rich account of how whalers settled disputes in the absence of formal legal institutions and the subsequent formation of property law regulating the American whaling industry. Deal is an associate professor of American history and director of graduate studies at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. He specializes in legal and environmental history. More details about the book can be found here: http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/history/early-republic-and-antebellum-history/law-whale-hunt-dispute-resolution-property-law-and-american-whalers-17801880?format=HB